Tag Archives: Germany

German students seek to tell Africa’s true story

A group of German students based in Mannheim, Germany who had a one-year stint in several African countries, including Rwanda, has decided to try to change the negative perception Western countries have about Africa. As such, they are organising an art exhibition that will feature five cities, including Kigali. The exhibition will seek to paint Africa in a way that previous western media reports have not. The art exhibition dubbed: “Sichtwechsel: Stadtbilder aus Afrika” which translates to “Missing images: Cityscapes from Africa” will be presented in Mannheim, Germany, in September. Following their time on the continent volunteering, the students found out that there were many positive things about Rwanda and the continent in general that were unknown to them previously. Sören Götz, a member of the group, said they hope the exhibition will open the eyes of the people in the West to see Africa as it really is and not what has been portrayed by sections of the media. “On the basis of predominantly one-sided and stereotyped media reports, many Germans do not know anything about the impressive metropolises the African continent has. With the exhibition, we want to change that perception as we show five well-chosen cities,” Götz said. The students are calling upon local artists to send in their work to be featured in the exhibition.Those interested can submit their pictures through www.missing-images.de. “We are requesting the inhabitants to send us their cityscapes which will be presented in the exhibition. Our idea is to present the cities from the perspective of their inhabitants,” Götz said. Local artists have welcomed the development terming it as another chance for Africa to tell their own story and undo the previous negative stories about the continent. Donatha Umurungi, a photographer based in Kigali, said the opportunity will benefit local photographers who cannot afford to organise exhibitions on their own. “This is a chance for local photographers to tell Rwanda’s story the way it is, putting into consideration our difficult past,” Umurungi  said. By Collins Mwai,The New Times

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France and Rwanda’s 1994 Genocide, a long wait

The belated trial of a genocide suspect in Paris highlights the complex political relationship between Rwanda and France. ...

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Ukraine ex-PM Tymoshenko calls for protests to continue

Ukrainian former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko has urged opposition supporters in Kiev’s Independence Square to continue their protests. Yulia Tymoshenko told the crowd that “heroes never die” Ms Tymoshenko, who has a back injury, addressed crowds from a wheelchair after being freed from detention. “Until you finish this job… nobody has the right to leave,” she said. Her speech came at the end of a dramatic day that saw President Viktor Yanukovych removed by MPs and fleeing Kiev, but refusing to stand down. Ms Tymoshenko broke down in tears as she told cheering supporters late on Saturday: “You are heroes. “Because nobody could… do what you have done,” she said. “We’ve eliminated this cancer, this tumour.” But while she was hailed by many in the audience, she does not enjoy universal support among the opposition, says the BBC’s David Stern in Kiev. Before she went into prison in 2011, her popularity ratings were dropping and many Ukrainians blame her in part for the chaos of the post-Orange Revolution years, or see her as a member of Ukraine’s corrupt elite. Dozens of people walked away in disgust when she appeared on the stage, the BBC’s Tim Wilcox in Independence Square reports. A vote by parliament on Friday paved the way for her release. She was sentenced to seven years in jail after a controversial verdict on her actions as prime minister. Earlier on Saturday, she left the hospital in the eastern city of Kharkiv, where she had been held under prison guard, and flew to Kiev. She told journalists at Kiev airport that those behind violence “must be punished”, the Interfax agency reports. The health ministry says 88 people are now known to have been killed since 18 February. Opposition seize control Ukraine’s parliament voted on Saturday to remove President Yanukovych and hold a presidential election on 25 May. The parliamentary vote came after police stopped guarding presidential buildings, allowing protesters into the presidential country residence outside Kiev, and parliament made new high-level appointments. Mr Yanukovych said events in Kiev were a “coup” and vowed not to stand down. He compared the actions of the opposition to the rise to power of the Nazis in 1930s Germany and claimed MPs from his party had been “beaten, pelted with stones and intimidated”. The opposition is now in effective control of the capital Kiev, with Mr Yanukovych’s last known whereabouts in Kharkiv after travelling there late on Friday night. Media reports have quoted Ukrainian officials as saying Mr Yanukovych was stopped by border police while attempting to fly to Russia aboard a private plane. Fiery orator Ms Tymoshenko’s release has been a key demand of the protest movement. The glamorous, fiery orator who helped lead the Orange Revolution – Ukraine’s revolt against a controversial election in 2004 – was convicted of criminally exceeding her powers when she agreed a gas deal with Russia which was seen to have disadvantaged Ukraine. She has always insisted the charges were untrue, inspired by Mr Yanukovych, the man she helped oust in 2004 who returned to defeat her in the 2010 presidential election. Her release was one of the conditions of the EU-Ukraine trade pact that President Yanukovych rejected last year – triggering the protests that led to the current crisis. European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso welcomed Ms Tymoshenko’s release, calling it “essential for a democratic Ukraine”. The US also hailed the move. “We continue to urge an end to violence by all sides and a focus on peaceful, democratic dialogue,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said in a statement...

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Pope to create 19 new cardinals

Pope Francis is due to appoint 19 new cardinals at a ceremony in Rome – the first such appointments of his papacy. Pope Francis Cardinals are the most senior Roman Catholic clergymen below the pontiff. Correspondents says the inclusion of prelates from places like Haiti and Burkina Faso reflects the Argentine Pope’s commitment to the poor. The new cardinals will receive the traditional red hat and robes at a formal ceremony known as a consistory. Sixteen of the new appointees are under 80, making them eligible to enter a conclave to elect the Pope’s successor. The new cardinals come from 12 countries, including Spain, Italy and Germany. Among them will be the head of the Catholic church in England and Wales, Archbishop Vincent Nichols. Five are from Latin America and the Caribbean. They will formally be inducted at a ceremony that is due to start at 11:00 local time (10:00 GMT). The BBC’s David Willey in Rome says Pope Francis’ appointments are being seen as a clear attempt to share decision-making in the church. The Pope is encouraging cardinals – old and new – to think outside the box in formulating new policies for the Catholic Church, our correspondent adds. The new recruits will join the more than 100-strong College of Cardinals, which has been meeting in plenary session behind closed doors at the Vatican for the past two days. The 19 new Cardinals Archbishop Pietro Parolin (Italy) Archbishop Lorenzo Baldisseri (Italy) Archbishop Gerhard Ludwig Muller (Germany) Archbishop, Beniamino Stella (Italy) Archbishop Vincent Nichols (Britain) Archbishop Leopoldo Jose Brenes Solorzano (Nicaragua) Archbishop Gerald Cyprien Lacroix (Canada) Archbishop Jean-Pierre Kutwa (Ivory Coast) Archbishop Orani Joao Tempesta (Brazil) Archbishop Gualtiero Bassetti (Italy) Archbishop Mario Aurelio Poli (Argentina) Archbishop Andrew Yeom Soo Jung (South Korea) Archbishop Ricardo Ezzati Andrello (Chile) Archbishop Philippe Nakellentuba Ouedraogo (Burkina Faso) Archbishop Orlando B. Quevedo (Philippines) Archbishop Chibly Langlois (Haiti) Monsignor Loris Francesco Capovilla (Italy) * Archbishop Fernando Sebastian Aguilar (Spain) * Monsignor Kelvin Edward Felix (St Lucia) * * Cardinal emeritus, without voting rights Agencies

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Germans plan one billion USD fertilizer plant in Dar

Natural gas in Tanzania has attracted a company from Germany which intends to invest over one billion US dollars in establishing a fertilizer plant in the country. Speaking in Dar...

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Low budgetary allocation cripples MSD’s efficiency

Meagre budgetary allocation to the Medical Stores Department (MSD) has been cited as a major challenge facing the department in carrying out its operations efficiently. MSD acting Director General, Mr Cosmas Mwaifwani told reporters in Dar es Salaam on...

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German court jails ex-Muvumba mayor for Genocide

A German court yesterday sentenced a former district mayor in Rwanda’s northeastern region to 14 years in jail over his involvement in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. Rwabukombe (in grey) is photographed by journalists as he awaits court ruling in Frankfurt yesterday. Net photo. Rwabukombe (in grey) is photographed by journalists as he awaits court ruling in Frankfurt yesterday. Net photo. The High Regional Court of Frankfurt found Onesphore Rwabukombe, the former burgomaster of the former Muvumba commune, guilty of “aiding and abetting” the Genocide. The case, the first trial of a suspect in the most brutal killings known to man to be conducted on German soil, opened three years ago. Rwabukombe, 56, who was convicted of conspiracy to commit Genocide, will serve time in a German prison. Prosecutors had asked for life sentence while defence sought an acquittal. Close to 100 witnesses testified in the trial. Rwabukombe was arrested on July 26, 2010 near Frankfurt in Germany. Reading the verdict, presiding Judge Thomas Sagebiel said while Rwabukombe did not directly kill, he oversaw and assisted in the murder of hundreds of men, women and children at the Kiziguro church compound in the Eastern Province. The Judge described scenes of slaughter committed with machetes and clubs, which Rwabukombe helped direct. The bench found that the former mayor personally drove militiamen to the site of the massacre in his pick-up truck. The lawyer representing the victims, Kanzlei Magsam, said he would appeal the decision. “If the court recognised that he encouraged people to take part in the genocide, then that’s a direct participation which amounts to a life sentence and that would be the ground for our appeal,” Magsam told The New Times shortly after the trial. “Considering that this was the first case to be tried in Germany and considering Rwabukombe’s age, 14 years is a fair sentence although we believe he should have been sentenced on all the crimes not just some of them.” Rwabukombe was arrested in Germany in 2010. It was not immediately clear whether defence would appeal the ruling...

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